Winter Reminder to Clear Pellet Stove Venting to Prevent Air Flow Blockage

Heavy snow buildup can definitely affect your pellet stove’s venting and your burn experience. Wood pellet stoves operate through a system of air intake and exhaust. If this system is hindered by a blockage, proper combustion of the pellets can’t happen. Unlike wood stoves, pellet stove venting can be either horizontal, vertical or both.

One of the ways a pellet stove burn exhaust can be set up is horizontally, straight through the exterior wall. (See Fig. A) The exterior vent allows proper air flow within the stove, and the exhaust to escape. If it’s blocked by dense snow – your stove’s ability to ignite and/or stay burning efficiently could be hindered. If your wood pellets aren’t burning through fully – this blockage could be the reason. (See Fig. B) 

A similar kind of venting is through the wall with a vertical rise (Fig. C). Vertical piping raises the exhaust further up the exterior wall. This kind of setup holds less risk of snow blockage. However, strong snow drifts (or very high snow accumulation) can still create blockage.

Pellet stoves can also have exhaust vents exiting through the roof – with some variations (Fig. D). If your roof has heavy snow piled up that hasn’t slid off or been pushed off, the vent could be blocked. Make sure to check for blockage – no matter how your stove is vented.

Speaking of snow…our Woodpellets.com delivery trucks park on the street, and bring your pallets up your driveway with a forklift. Of course, there is nothing you can do about large snow banks taking up space on the road, but you can make sure your driveway is plowed enough for our 8 foot wide forklift. This will help the driver make a successful delivery – and help you avoid delivery delays. 

Please let us know if you have any questions. Call 1-800-PELLETS to speak to an expert!

 

 

What Can We Expect the 2020-21 Winter Weather to Look Like?

According to the 2021 Farmers’ Almanac, this winter will have cold and snowy weather in the north, a drought in the west and a whole lot in between – which certainly explains why it’s described as the “Winter of the Great Divide”.

The almanac Editor Peter Geiger explains, “Our extended forecast is calling for yet another freezing, frigid, and frosty winter for two-thirds of the country.”

Read >> How the Farmers’ Almanac Predicts Weather

Their long-range forecast is calling for a cold winter with normal to below-normal temperatures in areas from the Great Lakes and Midwest, westward through the Northern/Central Plains and the Rockies.

The region from Tennessee through the lower Ohio River valleys up to the north and east up through New England has been described as the “wild card”, where we can expect a rather intense weather system. This weather system will keep the storms active, delivering a wintry mix of rainy, icy and/or snowy weather throughout the season.

To read the full forecast and more helpful information, get your copy of the 2021 Farmer’s Almanac!

 

Yes, Your Wood Pellets Can Be Stored Outside (With a Few Extra Steps)

We hear this question a lot this time of year because it’s not always possible to store wood pellets inside. Many folks don’t have a garage or available dry space outdoors, but that’s okay. In order to properly store your wood pellets outside, you just have to take a few extra steps.

Read >> See How This Family Sends Their Pellet Bags to the Basement for Storage

Pellets Stored OutsideFirst, make sure to fully inspect your delivery as soon as possible. Your fuel is carefully wrapped and protected with a plastic shroud before it’s sent out to you. If you find any rips or holes in the plastic shrouding, be sure to close them with water-proof tape or additional layers of plastic. Is there extensive damage or any wet bags? If so, call 1-800-PELLETS right away to speak with a Quality Manager.

The next step is very important.  Securely fasten a sturdy tarp over your skids. This will protect your fuel from water, weather and any birds or small animals that may try to puncture the plastic to make a home. Make sure the tarp is well connected to the pallet to avoid losing it with wind gusts.

Read >> Keep Your Outdoor-Stored Pellets Dry with This Simple Trick

If you’re interested in a much more convenient tarp, check out our brand new custom pallet covers with velcro access! Available in a 50” height for 1-ton skids and a 72” height for a 1.5 ton skid, each protective tarp is 49 inches in length and width, with a white outside and black underside. The 8×8 woven material is rated for 1 year of UV protection to help with protection from the elements.

Helpful Tips for Outdoor Storage:

  • Always make sure your pellets are delivered to an area in your yard or driveway that is free from any water pooling or flooding.
  • Leave the shrouds the fuel arrived wrapped in on as long as possible.
  • Check on your unopened skids through the season to make sure everything is still secure.
  • Place a weighted object on top of the skid to keep the tarp in place.
  • Use a ball on top but underneath the tarp to prevent pooling.
  • Use empty milk jugs filled with sand or water tied to the tarp’s edges to help properly secure it.
  • During the winter months, keep a path shoveled around your skids to help prevent any water and/or ice damage.

Make sure you do everything you can to protect your pellets. But in the rare instance they arrive damaged, all of our Quality Certified fuels are backed by guarantee. We are here for you if you have any questions. 

Farmers’ Almanac Extended Weather Forecast 2020

According to the 2020 Farmers’ Almanac, this winter will be filled with so many ups and downs on the thermometer, it may remind you of a “Polar Coaster.” The almanac Editor Peter Geiger explains, “Our extended forecast is calling for yet another freezing, frigid, and frosty winter for two-thirds of the country.”

Read >> How the Farmers’ Almanac Predicts Weather

The worst of the bitterly cold winter conditions will affect areas east of the Rockies all the way to the Appalachians. The Northeast, including the densely populated corridor running from Washington to Boston, will experience colder-than-normal temperatures for much of the upcoming winter.

With colder-than-normal temperatures in the Northeast and above-normal precipitation expected, the weather outlook forewarns of not only a good amount of snow, but also a wintry mix of rain, sleet—especially along the coast.

How long will it last? The forecast says spring will be slow to start with wet snow and unseasonably chilly conditions lingering across the Midwest, Great Lakes, Northeast, and New England through April.

To read the full forecast and more helpful information, order your copy of the 2020 Farmer’s Almanac!

 

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