Get Your Stove Ready for Fall

Woodpellets.comAside from the usual ash removal and general maintenance, your wood pellet stove needs additional care in order to operate at optimal safety and efficiency. So when it was time to shut down your stove for the summer, did you take the time to do so properly? Instead of just pulling the plug and walking away, responsible pellet stove owners should have used a quick shut-down checklist:

  • Turn off your stove and unplug it from the wall entirely
  • Use an ammonia-free, heat-safe cleaning solvent to clean the glass
  • Clean out the inside of the stove and hopper as best you can
  • Remove all leftover pellets (burned and unburned)

Probably the most important part of shutting down for the summer is removing all leftover residue and pellets. If you have moisture inside your stove, the leftover pellets will absorb it. This can cause rust to form, which could lead to costly damage.

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How to Properly Shut Down a Pellet Stove for Summer

Moisture in Pellet StoveIt’s about that time to shut down your pellet stove for the summer! Considering pellet stove costs range at an average of around 2-3 thousand dollars, with some at double that price, this heating system is a real investment that will benefit from a few extra steps taken for season shut-down. Instead of just pulling the plug and walking away, responsible pellet burners should have a quick shut-down checklist to follow.

Many owner’s manuals that come with pellet stoves are an excellent resource filled with tips and guidelines for maintaining a healthy stove. We have compiled our own Pellet Stove Season Shut-Down Best Practices, co-written by a Cleancare professional pellet stove technician.

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How To Clean Your Pellet Stove in 20 Minutes

Stop Wasting Time with Poor Stove Cleaning!

Do you hate cleaning your pellet stove? I do. It’s one of those necessary chores of pellet stove ownership that you come to dread. But over the last four years that I have been cleaning my stove, I have managed to reduce the time spent to just 20-30 minutes per month. I have found that the most critical step in cleaning your stove is having the right tools for the job.

1. Although it may seem obvious – a flashlight that you can wear on your head, or clamp to the side of the stove, is a must. Without the proper light, it is impossible to see all nooks and crannies where the ash is hiding. While the headlight allows you to use your hands for other tasks, it throws decent light wherever you turn your head to look.

2. Another must-have tool is a good stiff brush. I use an old nylon 2′ paint brush to sweep the ash from my heat exchanger, and off the walls of the stove itself. Don’t try to use a cheap flimsy brush. You need a sturdy one that can withstand the stress of regular cleaning.

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