DIY Projects: Wood Pallet Safety Guide

Woodpellets.com Pallet DIYs

We’re always encouraging our customers to try and re-use materials leftover from deliveries. However if you are planning to start a DIY project using wood pallets, it’s important to fully inspect them first.

Begin with checking for any suspicious spills or stains on the pallet. If you find any that aren’t sap, we don’t suggest using that pallet in case of past chemical contamination.

Next, check for the pallet’s stamp, which gives you information about the wood. Even if it could be completely safe, you shouldn’t use a pallet without one.

HT = Heat Treated. Pallets manufactured in North America are heat treated to control pests. This is a good symbol to see on a pallet.
DB = Debarked. This simply means the wood sourced for pallet making has had any bark on it removed. Many pallets have this stamp, but it doesn’t matter either way.
KD = Kiln Dried. The use of ovens or kilns on the wood is to control factors like warping and fungal growth. You might also see a DH code to note the use of dielectric heating.
MB = Methyl Bromide. DO NOT make use of pallets marked MB! Methyl bromide fumigation is a chemical pesticide treatment that can be very hazardous.

According to 1001 Pallets, “In 1987, the Montreal Protocol aimed to regulate the use of methyl bromide, along with multiple other chemicals found to impact the ozone. This type of treatment is now banned in Canada and many countries because it poses health risks to workers handling the pallets. However, you can still find it in some places. If you find an MB pallet (likely from Asia or Oceania), please do not use it for your craft projects or as firewood, find a waste-removal company that can dispose of it properly.”

Learn more about pallet safety here, and check out this visual guide on reading pallet stamps. Stay safe and have fun with your projects!

 

How to Use Wood Pallets in Your Garden

Woodpellets.com Quality Manager Joy explains how she used wood pallets from a recent delivery to keep her family’s garden organized:

We start our garden every year by taking compost from our compost pit. The compost is made of ash from our stove and food waste. We also sprinkle in wet damaged fuel. We then mix the compost with soil and roto-till it into the garden.

The next step was to take our pallets and cut off the bottom layer. We place the pallets into the newly mixed soil. Under the pallets is a plastic barrier, the soil is added on top and then we push the pallets in.

The next step is to take our pre grown plantlings and place them spaced apart.

Using this combination of pallets and the barrier plastic (made from Woodpellets.com delivery shrouds) our peppers, scallions, peas and green beans won’t get strangled with weeds!

Have you re-used wood pallets in your garden? Share your projects with us on the Woodpellets.com Facebook page!

Be Careful When Working with Wood Pallets

We love hearing from our customers on how they re-use leftover wood pallets from a home delivery.

If you decide to work on your own pallet DIY, be sure to take a look at the markings first. Remember to only reuse wood pallets stamped with “HT” – which stands for Heat Treated.

To learn more about what different stamps mean, and what pallet safety is all about, check out 1001 Pallets.

If you decide to burn your wood pallets, make sure you take into consideration where the metal remains will end up.

Check out the video below to see how many nails are leftover after burning – and how hidden they can be.

 

Do you have any pallet projects to share? Let us know!

Wood Pallet Bee Apiary Raised Platform by a Woodpellets.com Customer

Check out how a Woodpellets.com customer from New Hampshire used some leftover wood pallets for her bee apiary! She used two pallets, reinforced them with 2X6’s and raised them up using cement blocks.
Bee Apiary from Wood Pallets - Woodpellets.com

Amy says, “I’ve had my bees on this platform for 3 years and it’s perfect for me! I love being a bee keeper and trying to help them.”

Reducing, reusing and recycling is so important for the environment. There are so many ways to re-use what you might otherwise throw away, and all you need is a little creativity and (sometimes) a few tools.

Post a photo of your upcycle project on the Woodpellets.com Facebook page by August 1st to be entered in the 2019 Earth Day Pallet Project Contest. First place will receive a $50 Amazon gift card!

Wood Pallet DIY Contest: Enter to Win!

Wood Pallet Re-Use DIY Contest

When you finish burning a ton of wood pellets, you’re left with a wooden pallet and empty pellet bags. When you re-stack bags from your pellet delivery, you’re left with the pallets. What do you do with them? Show us a photo for a chance to win an Amazon gift card!

Post a photo of your upcycle project on the Woodpellets.com Facebook page by August 1st to be entered in the 2019 Earth Day Pallet Project Contest. First place will receive a $50 Amazon gift card!

Need some inspiration? Check out some of our past upcycling posts:

Woodpellets.com Wood Pallet DIY and Empty Wood Pellet Bag Reuse Challenge

Reducing, reusing and recycling is so important for the environment. There are so many ways to re-use what you might otherwise throw away, and all you need is a little creativity and (sometimes) a few tools.

Look How This Woodpellets.com Customer Reuses Wood Pallets

If you’ve received a pellet fuel delivery, you may have wondered what you could do with the leftover wood pallets. Stephen B. of Massachusetts (a Woodpellets.com customer) showed us a few of his pallet projects:

Pooch Assistance

“The first is a doggie tunnel I made to give clear passage for the dog in the winter. The outside has plastic sheeting from a pellet shipment. Skye is our dog. When the weather is poor the tunnel helps her to get out of the doggie door.”

Wood Pallet Dog Tunnel

Treehouse Hangout

“Here you see the pallet frame with the roof and porch framed. In the next photo I have the metal roof up and I’m getting ready for the siding. I used lots of other repurposed materials: old staircase from play system, telephone poles for supports, cedar fence panels, old doors.”

Wood Pallet Treehouse DIY

Clearly this structure is a large scale project. Stephen explains, “Been chipping away at the treehouse for a few seasons now. Free time is not too abundant.”

DIY Wood Pallet Bottle OpenerHe also somehow found the time to create this handy bottle opener to hang on the wall. As if we weren’t already impressed, he tells there’s a pellet bin project in the works too. Stay tuned for an update on that!

Do you have any wood pallet DIYs to share?

Tell us about them in the comments or on our Facebook page!

DIY: How to Make a Wood Pallet Bottle Opener

Wood Pallet Bottle Opener with Mason JarDo you have wood pallets leftover from a delivery? Don’t be so quick to get rid of them, because there are a variety of ways to reuse wood pallets!

See >> 9 Wood Pallet Projects to Try 

Our most recent pallet DIY project is a wall-mounted bottle opener. It doesn’t take a lot of time or materials, and it’s a great gift idea! Take a look at our video tutorial below to see how it’s done.

Depending on how you’d like to install your new bottle opener, there’s one quick final step. You can pre-drill holes to make wall-installation easier, or simply add strong magnets to the back to affix your project on a refrigerator.

Wood pallets can be handy to use as-is, too. If you had a bulk wood pellet delivery, and the pallets of fuel weren’t placed inside the garage with a pallet jack, you might consider re-stacking the wood pellet bags inside. If your space allows it, it’s a good idea to reuse the wood pallets to raise the newly re-stacked bags from the floor, protecting them from potential leaks/flooding.

See >> Best Practices for Wood Pellet Storage

Do you have any wood pallet DIY ideas? Let us know on Facebook!

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