Special, Lighter (30 Lb.) Wood Pellet Bags Growing in Popularity

30lb Lighter Bags of Wood Pellets

Do you have a long distance from where your pellets are kept to your stove? Did you get driveway delivery instead of 
garage delivery, and you have to manually move bags inside? Or, do you just find the regular 40-pound bags to be heavy?

Wood pellet brands are starting to branch out into making 30 pound bags available – which are 25% lighter than the standard weight bags. This might not sound like much of a difference to some people, but the ten pound difference per bag really adds up when stacking or moving bags inside near your stove.
Read more

Extended Spring Wood Pellet Pickup Hours!

Pick up by the bag or by the ton during extended Spring hours at Demers Garden Center in Manchester, NH! Not sure if picking up or taking delivery makes more sense for you? Check out our Pickup vs. Delivery Cost Comparison.

Wood Pellet Pickup in NH

Demers Garden Center: 656 South Mammoth Road Manchester NH 03109
Extended Spring Hours!  7 Days a Week: 9am to 5pm

New York and New Jersey Walk-in Pickup Locations:

(An interactive Google map of all NY/NJ Woodpellets.com Pickup Locations can be found here)

Route 23 Patio & Mason Center: 69 Route 23 North Hamburg NJ 07419

Monday – Friday 8am to 3pm
Saturday 8am to 1pm
Closed Sunday

See Available Product(s)

Wood Pellet Pickup in NYAdams FairAcre Farms: 765 Dutchess Turnpike Poughkeepsie NY 12603

Monday – Saturday 8am to 8pm
Sunday 8am to 7pm

See Available Product(s)

Adams FairAcre Farms: 1560 Ulster Avenue Lake Katrine NY 12449

Monday – Saturday 8am to 8pm
Sunday 8am to 7pm

See Available Product(s)

Adams FairAcre Farms: 
1240 Route 300 Newburgh NY 12550

Monday – Saturday 8am to 8pm
Sunday 8am to 7pm

See Available Product(s)

Adams FairAcre Farms: 160 Old Post Road Wappinger NY 12590

Monday – Saturday 8am to 8pm
Sunday 8am to 7pm

See Available Product(s)

Questions? Talk to an Expert: 1-800-735-5387

Is Snow Affecting Your Burning Efficiency?

Snowfall New England

Record snowfall has certainly been tough on those in the Northeast. Slippery conditions, heavy snow piling up, power outages and bitterly cold temperatures are just some of the struggles this winter has presented us with. The amount of snow accumulated in some regions has been crippling.

Although the temperatures are beginning to ease up, forecasters are predicting no significant dent in the huge snowbank accumulation soon. Bill Simpson of the National Weather Service Taunton, MA office explains, “It’s not going to be as significant as people think. It’ll melt, but not a good chunk. We’ve got a long way to go.” He believed there will only be a ten percent snow decrease in the next few days of warmer temperatures.

How does all this snow affect pellet stove owners? 

Pellet Stove Vent BlockageHeavy snow buildup can definitely affect your stove venting. This is a very common factor with burn issues right now. Unlike wood stoves, pellet stove venting can be either horizontal, vertical or both.

One of the ways a pellet stove burn exhaust can be set up is horizontally, straight through the exterior wall. (See Fig. A) The exterior vent allows proper air flow within the stove, and the exhaust to escape. If it’s blocked by dense snow – your stove’s ability to ignite and/or stay burning efficiently could be hindered. If your wood pellets aren’t burning through fully – this blockage could be the reason. (See Fig. B) 

A similar kind of venting is through the wall with a vertical rise (Fig. C). Vertical piping raises the exhaust further up the exterior wall. This kind of setup holds less risk of snow blockage. However, strong snow drifts (or very high snow accumulation) can still create blockage.

Pellet stoves can also have exhaust vents exiting through the roof – with some variations (Fig. D). If your roof has heavy snow piled up that hasn’t slid off or been pushed off, the vent could be blocked. Make sure to check for blockage – no matter how your stove is vented.

Another way snow affects your wood pellets is by through delivery delays.

The Woodpellets.com delivery trucks are wide, and they need enough space to safely travel down your road and park. Once parked, the forklift is lowered from the truck to unload the pallet(s) to be brought up your driveway. Of course, there is nothing you can do personally about large snowbanks taking up valuable space on the road. However, you can make sure your driveway is plowed enough for our 9 foot wide forklift. Making sure there is clear space for the forklift to maneuver on will help the driver make a successful delivery – and help you avoid delivery delays. 


Please let us know if you have any questions. Call 1-800-PELLETS to speak to an expert!



Are You At Risk of Running Out of Pellets?

Will I run out of wood pellets?It’s late into the winter – yet the Northeast is still being relentlessly hit with heavy snow and freezing temperatures. You might be starting to wonder if your pellet supply will last you through the rest of the heating season.

You’re not alone in this quandary.

This is a tricky time of year – where a wood pellet user must decide to gamble with a low supply and risk potential supply shortages, or choose to just play it safe and top off his or her supply now.

Of course no one knows for sure what will happen with the weather for the remainder of the winter. There is historical data, professional forecasters, and even a groundhog that can give a prediction – but there is no real way to know with absolute certainty. Earlier this year, we wrote about the Farmer’s Almanac weather prediction, which hasn’t been fully accurate. The Northeast prediction was a much colder than normal winter, which has been true, and “below normal snowfall”, which has not been true. Unfortunately, last winter much colder than many had anticipated…leading to a late winter shortage in many areas. With the harsh winter we have already experienced, there is certainly a possibility for more regional shortages again this year.

So, are you at risk of running out of pellets? Well, there are many factors that will determine your risk. Your pellet stove model, the prominence of secondary heating sources, the type of wood pellets burned, and the area of your home you heat with pellets are just some of the many variables that affect your fuel consumption.

Read more

How Are Wood Pellets Made?

The Science Channel

Raw materials brought to pellet mills can arrive in many different forms. Some of the raw material may be sawdust, wood chips, lumber mill scrap, and even full trees unsuitable for lumber. The raw materials may be green, or freshly cut, may be partial dry or even kiln dried. By processing these raw material all in the same way, the end product has consistent moisture content, heat value, ash content, and burn characteristics. 

Typically, the process starts by running the raw material through a hammer mill. These machines take sawdust and wood chips and break them down into a more consistent smaller size. Large dryer drums are then used to take out any extra moisture. After the drying is complete, the material is processed further in a mill to make an even finer material.

Read more

Quality Assurance and Convenient Delivery – What Makes Woodpellets.com Different

Two of the main contributing factors to what makes the Woodpellets.com experience different are – product quality assurance and the convenient delivery system. In order to explain these processes accurately, we let Joy (Quality Assurance Manager) and Dan (Delivery Logistics Manager) describe their main responsibilities – in their own words.

Quality Assurance Manager: My primary function is to work for our customers.  I am the before, during and after the order point of contact – from Customer Service, to the burn experience at home.  Basically, the service doesn’t stop with the delivery – because I’m there to make sure user expectations are met and (hopefully) exceeded.

Read more

Where are the Wood Pellets Going? A Look at Global Biomass Exports

Wood pellet mills across America are running at full capacity, yet some retailers are still struggling with supply levels. Many consumers have felt the strain this year – by being turned away or having to wait for pellets. So if mills are producing the supply as quickly as possible – where are the pellets going?

Not long ago, about 80 percent of pellets made in the United States were used domestically, largely for residential heating. Today, wood pellet heating has grown from a residential home heating alternative into an international energy and environmental super-power. Wood pellet exports from the United States have
doubled since last year – with more than half the exports going to the United Kingdom.

Wood pellets import export, 2013 Map US to EU
Read more

Top 5 Wood Pellet Myths Explained

Myth #1: Hardwood Pellets are Better than Softwood

Wood Pellets

Preference for hardwood over softwood has its origins in the firewood burning community. It has long been considered better to burn hardwood in your wood stove or fireplace because it provides a longer burn compared to softwood. The main reason that hardwood burns better than softwood in wood stoves/fireplaces has to do with wood density (hardwood is more dense than softwood).

However, with wood pellets the advantages of hardwood are neutralized by the pelletizing process. Both hard and softwood material is dried to the same moisture level, of about 4-5%. Furthermore, regardless of the type of wood used to produce the pellets, the pelletizing process produces wood pellets with the same density.  Once the moisture and density variance has been removed during the manufacturing process, softwood comes out ahead in terms of heat and performance.

But why does softwood produce hotter pellets with less ash? Biomass Magazine explains: “softwood has a higher percentage of resin content than hardwood, which will produce more heat per pound.”

The choice between hardwood and softwood pellets is entirely up to the consumer. There are some very high quality hardwood pellets available in the market that perform very well, but for the most part, softwood pellets will typically provide you with more heat for your money.

Read more

Wood Pellet Market Update

There is only one word to describe the current market in wood pellets – unprecedented. Many of the changes that have happened in the pellet industry have been brewing for years, but the effects have really been felt by consumers since last spring. The appeal of wood pellet fuel has never been stronger, but that has driven some changes that every buyer of pellets will see.

New Stove Sales

Wood Pellet Delivery

Pellet stove sales continue to grow by leaps and bounds. The comfort and warmth generated by a pellet stove, combined with the run-up in heating oil prices and propane last winter, has convinced many households in New England to install a pellet stove. Many of the stove shops we work with in have let us know that their installations of new stoves are up as much as 50% so far this year and sales continue to be strong this fall. Anyone buying a new stove can see a wait time of several weeks for installation as the stores work to keep up with sales. These new stoves mean more people looking for pellets this fall.

Read more

Wood Pellet Delivery Peak Season FAQs

It’s the time of year where the phones are steadily ringing, and we are talking with many new and returning customers. Due to other retailers running out of wood pellets and the time of year, our phone call volumes have significantly increased. The Woodpellets.com team is always happy to get you the answers you are looking for, so we have compiled a list of the most frequently asked questions we are hearing during this seasonal rush.

Wood Pellet Delivery1. Do you have wood pellets to sell me?

If you type in your zip code on our website, or tell us on the phone, you will receive a list of available inventory in your area. You might see “Backordered” or “Sold Out” at times. However, if we tell you on the phone or you see online that pellets are available – that means we have them. We would never knowingly sell wood pellets or wood bricks that aren’t available.

Read more

Recent Tweets